Meeting emissions targets for ships is tough but possible

A new GHG Pathway Model from the latest Maritime Forecast to 2050 report can help the maritime industry to assess and prepare for the effects of regulatory and technological change in reducing world fleet greenhouse gas emissions.“Meeting International Maritime Organization (IMO) targets for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shipping will take mandatory requirements for individual ships, and other policy measures to support the development and use of new fuels and technologies,” says Tore Longva, one of the lead authors of the Maritime Forecast to 2050, and Principal Consultant at DNV GL’s Regulatory Affairs section. “This is a clear message that resulted when we asked our model what would happen when selecting various regulatory pathways for reducing GHGs from shipping. The findings are timely as the IMO discusses how to prioritize and decide which measures to pursue.”Modelling the future world fleet and its emissionsThe Maritime Forecast to 2050, one of DNV GL’s Energy Transition Outlook 2019 reports, takes its focus from the IMO GHG ambitions, and from growing external pressure on shipping to cut emissions. It examines how shipping may meet the GHG targets given various potential developments in energy efficiency, logistics and alternative fuels. Applying the GHG Pathway Model based on long-term trends, the report projects possible pathways for the world fleet size, fuel mix and CO2 emissions towards 2050 for the expected transport demand.“We believe the results....

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